Canaries in the Coal Mine: Women and Multiple Chemical Sensitivity [WEBINAR]

A free online event presented by the Canadian Women’s Health Network, in collaboration with National Network on Environments and Women’s Health and CIHR Team in Gender, Environment and Health

When: Tuesday, Dec. 13, 2011 from 10:00-11:00 p.m. PST
Where: online
Presented by Geneviève Nadeau, doctoral student at University of Ottawa’s School of Political Studies
Moderated by Anne Rochon Ford, Executive Director of the Canadian Women’s Health Network
Presented in English with bilingual question period

An estimated 3 to 5 per cent of Canadians have developed sensitivities to chemicals in our day-to-day environment. Women constitute 60 to 80 per cent of people suffering from these multiple chemical sensitivities (MCS). What are the potential gendered components of this contested health issue, and how do they echo broader conversations related to women’s health and environmental health policy in Canada?

Geneviève Nadeau conducted a critical review of MCS-related literature in the social sciences in the context of a scholarship of the CIHR Team in Gender, Environment and Health. She offers insight on some multifaceted dimensions of MCS related to the health of Canadian women. Nadeau will answer questions in English and French after her talk.

Can’t attend? Email admin@cwhn.ca to request a reminder when we post the webinar recording.

Production of this event has been made possible through a financial contribution from Health Canada. The views expressed herein do not necessarily represent the views of Health Canada.

Community Advisory Re: Canada Pension Plan Disability

documentWe have been advised by Canada Pension Plan (CPP) that it has determined the Third Party Administration Act is not being properly applied.

Lawyers advising CPP have said that a third party cannot make a Reconsideration Request of a CPP denial on behalf of someone unless they have a Power of Attorney or some other type of legal authority from that person.

Even if a client signs the CPP Authorization to Communicate, they still have to provide a written request.

This means that if an advocate assists someone with a Reconsideration Request, they need to provide a letter signed by their client stating the client wishes to request a reconsideration of their CPP disability benefits denial, and that they authorize the advocate to represent them.

If you have any questions about this change, please contact the BCCPD’s Peter Beaudin at peter@bccpd.bc.ca

SPARC BC's Accessibility Tip # 100: Housing that works for everyone

Welcome signWhile great strides have been made in creating accessible public spaces, there is a shortage of even minimally accessible private housing in Canada for people who want to “age in place” or who have reduced mobility. Newly constructed homes often contain the same major barriers as older, existing homes: steps at every entrance, narrow interior doors – with the bathroom door usually the narrowest door in the house!

While The National Building Code of Canada is concerned mainly with commercial properties and multi-family dwellings, many of its requirements are becoming more and more popular for single family residences, especially as the population ages. The words “accessibility” and “visitability” have a lot in common.

The visibility movement offers three key features to ensure that everyone, regardless of mobility, will be able to at least visit, use the washroom and exit the home: a zero step entrance at the front, back or side entrance; wider doorways on all main floors; and a half or full bath on the main floor. Other opportunities exist to enhance the visitability of a new residence. These include locating the bedroom(s) on the main level of a multi-level structure; locating the laundry on the main level; access to and ample space within the kitchen; and customizable designs to allow buyers the flexibility to alter homes for their best use. Visitability can be integrated into the home at the design phase of a new home to increase your options as your family’s needs change over time.

The building of accessible and visitable housing provides the opportunity for seniors and others with disabilities to remain living independently in their own homes and community.

For further information, please read the article retrieved from Accessibility News at http://www.accessibilitynews.ca/?p=1393.

Have a suggestion for an Accessibility 100 tip? Email klai@sparc.bc.ca